Watch youtube videos at speed 2x

When one is tired of reading lengthy study materials, sometimes watching explanatory youtube videos is a good way to take a break, while still getting some studying done. The problem is, while some videos are informative, they are often at a very slow pace, some even more boring than plain text.

Recently my friend Ninad shared a simple trick with me to overcome this – he said to simply watch the videos at twice the speed. It works surprisingly well! Even the narration can still be understood. Use this one as an example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQ_8aPTydr4

youtube speed

Click on the little gear icon to speed up the video

For vidoes like these, ones that just give you a little bit of visual aid/ big picture rather than specific details, I think this is the way to go. Now you can be twice as efficient!

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Insulation Stuff (BDCS)

LOOSE FILL

 :)  :(
Cellulose High recycle content
Low embodied energy
Cotton High recycle content
Low embodied energy
Fiberglass
Perlite
Vermiculite Might contain asbestos
Plastic Fiber

BOARD

 :)  :(
EPS Not ozone-depleting
Flexible
High embodied energy
XPS High R-value
High compressive strength
High resistance to water absorption
Ozone-depleting
Expensive
Polyiso Not ozone-depleting
Recycled content
High embodied energy
Polyurethane Not ozone-depleting
High R-value
Expensive

SPRAYED

 :)  :(
Sprayed Polyurethane
(Close Cell, High Density)
High R-value Ozone-depleting
 Sprayed Polyurethane
(Open Cell, Low Density)
Not Ozone-depleting Low R-value
 Icynene (Low Density) Good for retrofitting

Difference between Malleability and Ductility

“The difference between malleability and ductility is that malleability is the ability to deform easily upon the application of a compressive force, and ductility is doing the same with tensile force.

*Ductility is a mechanical property used to describe the extent to which materials can be deformed plastically without fracture.

In material science, ductility specifically refers to a material’s ability to deform under tensile stress; this is often characterized by the material’s ability to be stretched into a wire.

Malleability, a similar concept, refers to a material’s ability to deform under compressive stress; this is often characterized by the material’s ability to form a thin sheet by hammering or rolling. Ductility and malleability do not always correlate with each other; for instance, gold is both ductile and malleable, but lead is only malleable. ”

Source: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090303051823AAFRJmT

Difference between Laitance & Efflorescence

Laitance and efflorescence are really two completely different things, but they are both white, powdery substances, which can be confusing.

In short, laitance is formed when there’s too much water in the concrete mix, while efflorescence is the deposit on masonry surfaces caused by soluble salts in the units or in the mortar.

Laitance can be avoided by controlling the amount of water in the concrete mix. Efflorescence can be prevented, or at least minimized, by selecting materials free of harmful salts and by preventing water from penetrating the masonry. This may be accomplished by the use of solid and tight mortar joints, capped walls, effective flashing, and adequate weather protection of the masonry during construction.

Both laitance and efflorescence can present both cosmetic AND structural problems.

read more:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Efflorescence
http://www.concreteconstruction.net/concrete-articles/meaning-of-laitance.aspx

 

 

Air Entrainment

Air-entraining agents is a type of admixture.

Air entrainment is the intentional creation of tiny air bubbles in concrete. The bubbles are introduced into the concrete by the addition to the mix of an air entraining agent, a surfactant (surface-active substance, a type of chemical that includes detergents). The air bubbles are created during mixing of the plastic (flowable, not hardened) concrete, and most of them survive to be part of the hardened concrete. The primary purpose of air entrainment is to increase the durability of the hardened concrete, especially in climates subject to freeze-thaw; the secondary purpose is to increase workability of the concrete while in a plastic state.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_entrainment